Storm Katia rapidly weakens after making landfall near Tecolutla, Mexico

Mexico is dealing with the aftermath of a huge quake that struck on Thursday night, and President Enrique Pena Nieto said on Friday that Katia could be especially unsafe in hillsides rocked by the magnitude 8.1 tremor.

The light damage so far is good news to national disaster officials who are already coping with the aftermath of a magnitude 8.1 quake that killed more than 60 people in southern Mexico.

As of 11 p.m. EDT, the NHC recorded that Hurricane Katia has a maximum sustained wind of 85 miles per hour and moving towards a western path at 3 miles per hour.

It says the storm was centered about 130 miles (210 kilometers) north of the port of Veracruz and it seems headed for strike early Saturday in an area known as the Emerald Coast that is popular with Mexican tourists.

According to reports, the Katia could possibly bring a strong volume of rainfall that can result to life-threatening flash floods and mudslides, particularly in the areas' mountainous terrain.

The National Hurricane Center says Irma made landfall on the Camaguey Archipelago of Cuba late Friday and has maximum sustained winds of 160 miles per hour.

Luis Felipe Puente, head of Mexico's national emergency services agency, said two people were killed by the hurricane, which roared onshore in Veracruz state, pelting the region with intense rains and winds.

Fluctuations in Hurricane Jose's intensity are possible for the next day or so, the National Hurricane Center said, and the storm is expected to gradually weaken after that.

Another report mentioned that Katia is believed to make a landfall by Friday evening or Saturday morning. A hurricane warning means that it's expected to hit about 12-24 hours, the NHC noted in its update. Hardest-hit was Juchitan, Oaxaca, where 36 people died and a third of the city's homes collapsed or were otherwise rendered uninhabitable, President Enrique Pena Nieto said late Friday in an interview with the Televisa news network.

Almost 2,900 people have been evacuated from their homes in Veracruz, and 1,500 more relocated to storm shelters in the neighboring Puebla state, AP reports.


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