Supreme Court Reinstates Part of Trump's Travel Ban

Dmitry Peskov, spokesman for Russian President Vladimir Putin, also declared Tuesday that there is no indication that a chemical weapons strike is in the works.

This includes nationals of six countries-Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen-and refugees who do not have a bona fide relationship with a US person or entity.

Matt Adams, legal director of the Seattle-based Northwest Immigrant Rights Project, which filed one of many lawsuits against the policy, said he still expects some confusion at airports, at least initially.

Russian Federation continues to deny that Assad's forces carried out the April 4 gas attack and Peskov criticized the White House for saying there were signs of preparation for "another" such strike. The travel restrictions reinstated by the Supreme Court also do not apply to Iraqi nationals (the EO affecting Iraqi nationals was revoked on March 6, 2017).
The Supreme Court's stay authorizes a foreign national admitted to school for study or hired for work in the US or invited to serve as a lecturer before an American audience to seek a visa based on their "credible claim" to have a "bona fide relationship" with a USA person or entity".

Peskov criticized the White House warning to Assad, saying "such threats to Syria's legitimate leaders are unacceptable". The court's opinion focused primarily on the government's request to reinstate the ban while the cases are before the Supreme Court.

"We will keep those traveling to the United States and partners in the travel industry informed as we implement the order in a professional, organized, and timely way", the statement said.

The spokesperson condemned such policies and said it is regrettable that the USA government is closing its eyes on the real perpetrators of terrorist attacks in the United States and misguiding public opinion just because of its short-sighted economic justifications.

The executive order, which was signed a week after Trump took office in January, initially called for denying individuals from Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen from entering the US for 90 days.

"Nine justices delivered a reminder yesterday of why the Supreme Court was such an important campaign issue".

"Today's compromise will burden executive officials with the task of deciding - on peril of contempt - whether individuals from the six affected nations who wish to enter the United States have a sufficient connection to a person or entity in this country", Thomas wrote, joined by two fellow conservative justices. By October, the ban will have expired and the review should be complete.

They added that the court has made an "implicit conclusion" that the administration will prevail. He claimed it was needed to protect the US from terrorists, but opponents said it was unfairly harsh and was meant to meet Trump's campaign promise of keeping Muslims out of the United States. EO-2 contained mechanisms to extend this ban indefinitely, and to add additional countries over time. "It preserves the authority of the Supreme Court to say what the law is-even though, by its own terms, it fails to say what the law is". He has criticized federal judges who have blocked the move. Three justices - Clarence Thomas, Samuel Alito and Trump appointee Neil Gorsuch - said they would have allowed the travel ban to take effect as written.

Because the executive order was stopped by lower courts, travelers from the six countries have been entering the United States by following normal visa procedures.

Lawyers for challengers to the order rushed to federal courts, and the order was stayed within days. The Order refers to restriction of entry and travel of nationals from these countries (rather than suspension of visa processing) but there is no provision to suggest that nationals of these countries will be able to seek visa renewals during the period of restriction of entry.

Information for this article was contributed by Robert Barnes of The Washington Post; by Michael D. Shear and Adam Liptak of The New York Times; and by Mark Sherman, Ted Bridis and Josh Lederman of The Associated Press.


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