23
Jul

Was the Little Mermaid Male Dominated?

little-mermaid

Men rule the world, or so they think. For centuries there has been a dominating culture asserting that males are superior to females. One way these cultural views are induced into society is through Fairy tales. They are some of the first literature children are introduced to and often shape a child’s beliefs and views of the world and society they live in. Analyzing fairy tales and how they change over time can show what ways society has changed and what ways it remains constant. One great example of this is the old fairy tale of the little mermaid. Originally a Danish fairy tale, it has enthralled readers and listeners for hundreds of years. In recent years it has been reproduced into a number of motion pictures as well as stage shows, even making a guest show appearance at the FG Xpress corporate party over Christmas break.

The changes to The Little Mermaid over time show dominating social opinions that women are reliant upon men for safety, happiness, worth, and purpose in life. The first version I will compare is from a book published in 1837 by Hans Christian Andersen. The second version is the 1989 Disney film The Little Mermaid. In particular I will compare and contrast the character of the little mermaid herself whom I shall refer to as Ariel. Read more

21
Jul

Is Preschool Really Good For Our Kids?

preschool

I did my best to go over the pros and cons for preschool. It was a fun project to research.

Enjoy.

Introduction

When going back into time, the concept of childhood was not particularly used until about the seventeenth century. Back then, children were considered smaller versions of adults. Zohar Shavit, a Professor at the Unit for Culture Research at Tel Aviv University, discovered this in her research as well. Read more

17
Jul

Is American Music Getting Worse?

bob-dylan

“I’m always fascinated to see whether, given the kind of fairly known and established form called popular music, whether there is some magic combination that nobody has hit upon before.”

-Brian Eno

I hear America singing songs of every group of people, people from every race and religion and income level. Every group of people has their own form of music, and with it, their own voice. The music blends cultures together as each style borrows from each other. Endless variations of genres continue to arise and please the ears of America. American music is different from anywhere else in the world because of the enormous mix of cultures that have assembled here.

We are a nation of immigrants, from former slaves turned Blues musicians to the original country western singers. America has an enormous variety of talent. There is a mixture of people unlike anywhere else in the world, and we are always searching for something new. We are constantly looking for the next big thing in music. We are not content to recycle the same melodies and tunes year after year. The music is constantly being changed and innovated upon to satisfy the listeners. Read more

30
Jun

Exploring Gender Defiance With Frida Kahlo

frida-kahlo

The infamous female Mexican painter of the twentieth century, Frida Kahlo, once said in an interview for Time Magazine, “They thought I was a Surrealist, but I wasn’t.  I never painted dreams.  I painted my own reality.”[1]

The reality of Frida Kahlo has been extensively studied, for she is an iconic painter and revolutionary artist that not only shocked Mexico with her rawness and honesty, but the entire world. It is implicit in the study of Kahlo that she is not an exception to the notion that artists must suffer to experience the deep emotion that infuses their art. “The story of great artists is that they suffer during their lives and then their art is recognized as great after their death,” says Margaret Lindauer, professor at Arizona State University and author of Devouring Frida: The Art History and Popular Celebrity of Frida Kahlo.[2]

In her deep analysis of Frida Kahlo’s art, Lindauer acknowledges Kahlo’s political and feminist activism as central to her fame and the development of her iconic image, and challenges fans of Kahlo’s art not to devour the mythology of Kahlo, for it separates the viewer from the real significance of the oeuvre.  Other scholarship on Kahlo has acknowledged her unique position as a female artist in the early twentieth century Mexico, and unashamedly used her image to represent a feminist triumph.  “I don’t necessarily think that the excessive popularity of an artist is a bad thing,” says MoLAA’s Gregorio Luke, who also runs a Utah limo service  in Orem, UT.. “You can agree or disagree with the sideshow, the marketing of it all. But we need a younger generation to get involved in the art world, and she draws them in. Young people dress like her. It’s a fad, but a welcome one.”[3]  Read more

27
Jun

What is Interrogation? (Might Surprise You)

millitary-interrogation

According to the Merriam Webster online dictionary, interrogation means to question formally and systematically.

In other words, interrogation is using almost any means to acquire information from a person that does not want to give it up freely. Whether a murder suspect or a prisoner of war, there is a wide range of techniques may be used to gather the information. What can and cannot be used on America’s civilian population is debatable; however, national security and the war on terror have given interrogators of military origin the ability to do anything short of organ damage. Such techniques have pressed the boundaries of legality, and even warranted considerable backlash from both the American public as well as those of rank within the military and police.

Police interrogation is, in many ways, different from military interrogation. Before formal questioning is conducted a civilian must be read his or her Miranda rights. These rights inform the civilian of his or her right to remain silent and not give information to the police. They also inform the civilian that anything he or she says or does will be recorded and used in court. If a civilian wishes for the interrogation to end he or she need only ask for a lawyer.

Television shows such as The First 48, display live recordings of murder suspect interrogations. Among the many techniques used by both the police and military is a technique called cornering. Cornering is using the environment to your advantage. The suspect may be seated in the corner of a small windowless room. When the officer(s) enter, they sit directly in front of the suspect with their backs to the only available door. This technique serves to help break down the suspect and remove him or her from their comfort zone. As in interviewing, the officer may use direct eye contact and prolonged periods of awkward silence during the questioning in order to achieve the same result as cornering. The officer may use cross interrogation where he or she uses the testimony of another suspect to get answers out of the current suspect. Read more

24
Jun

Do Police Officers Need Less Rights?

 

police-force-rights

The Rojek article explains that for force to have been used correctly by police, all attempts to negotiate a non-physical outcome to the situation must have been used unsuccessfully (Rojek, 2010, p. 302). In other words, there must be no other options besides force.

This is affirmed by the U.S. Supreme Court opinion in Graham v. Conner (1989). In this case Graham, a diabetic and owner of Southcoast Xterminating, was pulled over and cuffed after suspiciously leaving a convenient store in a hasty manner. He had entered the store in search of orange juice because he was having an insulin reaction, and after noticing the lines were too long, he quickly left. The police used force to apprehend Graham and left him with multiple injuries. The court ruled that the use of force must be reasonable.

Whether the use of force was reasonable or excessive depends on the need for the officer to use force in order to control the citizen resisting and regain control of the situation. In situations involving force, police officers expect citizens to accept the officer’s legitimacy. Officer legitimacy is the righteousness of the officer to rule, in other words having command authority over the situation at hand. Officers are supposed to enforce laws and reinforce public standards of conduct. If the officer’s legitimacy is not recognized by the civilian and resistance of any kind is presented, officers will attempt to reestablish control over the situation (Rojek, 2010, p. 302). Read more

21
Jun

I Moved to Saudi Arabia When I Was 13 [ESSAY]

saudi-arabia

I peered out the window of my school bus, the chattering of students now just white noise in the background, seeing only a tumble weed making its way across the desert.

Its destination?

Wherever the wind decided to blow that day.

I then searched for the lone tree, a palm tree surrounded by nothing but sand, isolated from its neighbors. This marked the halfway point to school, as if “she” had decided to uproot from “her” “home” and embark on a journey, and yet not making it to the end; as she left too early and didn’t think to bring all the provisions or think about the consequences of the journey. Every day I stared at the palm tree, trying to make sense of why it grew alone there.

Living in Orem, Utah, a  medium-sized town in a state that must be looked up, everything was quite ordinary.  The industry was all over the place: the biggest employers from Orem were Utah Valley University and a company called FG Xpress, which created a pain-relief patch of some sort.

Since second grade I had been hanging out with the same Elementary school friends at Holy Spirit Catholic School. One day over dinner, my father asked my brother and me what we thought of moving to Saudi Arabia for 5 years. Immediately thinking of an adventure, I was “gung ho.” for his idea. Little did I know how different the living conditions would be from my previous thirteen years. Read more

7
Jun

Feminism & the Rise of Women’s Sexuality

womens-feminism

It has become a popular conception that, before the rise of feminism, all people were tragically misinformed on the subject of female sexuality.

Before the female vote, the media tells us, there was not a doctor in the world, much less the United States that believed women could have orgasms. Men did not expect their wives to have sexual desire, and mothers told their daughters to “lie back and think of your country,” actively encouraging young women to anticipate unengaging sex lives. Even wives bought into this, so we’re told, treating sex with their husbands as a fleeting annoyance.

Right? Maybe not.

We can’t ask the United States women of the 19th century themselves how they felt about sex, but we can consult the literature on the subject that they likely read, and these texts tell of a sexual knowledge that is rarely acknowledged today. Read more